Properly Maintaining Your Home – Thrush & Son

Journeymen 2

Whether it be your refrigerator, dining room table or even your vehicle, every item in your home generally requires some sorts of proper maintenance to guarantee the life expectancy of that product. Believe it or not, this general rule even applies to home improvements. There are certain ways that you may be able to maintain the product yourself, but in other cases it is best to call a professional home improvement company to service the product for you.

The number one area, in general, on a roof that causes areas of concern or problems is your chimney. The method of chimney flashing has evolved over the years, as well as the products used. The days of throwing granules over tar, to act as flashing, have long passed. Today the common material used when installing chimney flashing is custom bent metal. Something to keep in mind is that metal is a conductor. Therefore, it will transfer temperature, hot and cold. Due to the extreme weather elements that we experience in Ohio, freezing and thawing, expansion and contraction will occur. Because of this expansion and contraction, the roof and the metal flashing can actually shift and warp, causing nail pops or even tears. This is one reason why common flashing maintenance is recommended.

Another area that homeowners tend to focus on, yet over look at the same time, is gutter maintenance. We all know that our gutters should be cleaned out from time to time, depending on the growth around your home, to ensure proper drainage and limit build up from Mother Nature’s debris. But did you know, that about every five to eight years you should have any miters, end caps and outlets resealed with gutter sealer? Gutter sealer is not a permanent, long term solution. Just like anything, it has a product life expectancy. If you notice water leaking out of your end caps or dripping from your miters, your gutter sealant has begun to fail, not your gutters. It’s time to make a call.

Lastly, when looking at your front door, have you noticed the paint or stain beginning to fade? Maybe the finish is starting to blister? There is generally a reason behind this. Maybe the door has reached its last opening. But a question I ask is “Have you had or do you have a storm door on that opening?” Did you know he average exterior replacement door states “Not to be installed with a self-storing storm door” within their warranty. The reason behind this is the bake factor, and I am not talking cookies. If your front door is in an area directly facing the sunlight, the air pocket within the two doors can reach over 300 degrees! Yes, you read that right, 300 degrees! With temperatures reaching that high, sealants located on the door will melt and the finish will drastically be effected. That’s why many door manufactures automatically void the warranty if a storm door is, in way shape, way or form, involved. There are a few manufactures that do recognize the importance and the appeal of a storm door. These select manufacturers have figured out a way to guarantee a homeowner, who has an existing or to-be installed self-storing storm door, a 5 year paint and finish warranty on the door itself. Other manufacturers have even reached seven years by upgrading the products used during the production process, including a clear automotive coating. But again these doors are not maintenance free. A simple coat of wax once a year, and sometimes twice, will help satisfy and ensure your doors warranty.

I hope some of these tips will help you in the future when it comes to maintaining your home. Now that spring in finally here, it may be time to start planning your next home improvement project. For more home improvement information, tips and ideas, check out my blogs at www.TheHomeImprovementMinute.com.

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